You Can Sue             31 January 2019


Chapter 6:     Premature Birth Risk due to Induced Abortion History

            

 Brent Rooney (MSc, email: youcansue@gmail.com)

                      Chapter 6 address: http://www.top-sue.org/chapter-6

Summary

    Babies born prematurely (under 37 weeks’ gestation) face

raised risk of many serious handicaps compared to babies born

full-term. Two (2) of the risks, cerebral palsy (CP) and Autism,

can have total lifetime cost (medical + non-medical + lower

salary) for U.S. residents running well over 1 million dollars. The

more premature the birth, the higher the CP and Autism risks.

There is no excuse for not warning young women about future

raised risk of newborns with CP, Autism and other IA(Induced

Abortion) risks on consent forms, since over 50 years ago (1967)

high profile abortion advocate, Dr. Malcolm Potts, admitted that:

    “...there seems little doubt that there is a true relationship

    between the high incidence of therapeutic abortion and

    prematurity. The interruption of pregnancy in the young

    (under seventeen) is more dangerous than in other cases...”

Four (4) ‘study of studies’ (aka meta-analysis), the strongest

category of medical evidence, support IA history as

significantly raising preterm birth risk (with ZERO ‘study of

studies’ reporting no raised ‘preemie’ risk due to abortion

history). Raised cerebral palsy risk due to premature birth has

been an accepted medical fact for over 55 years. Do not pursue

a medical negligence law suit, unless your trusted lawyer affirms

that your odds of legal success are very good.

..._____________________________________________...

 

    Prematurely newborn babies (under 37 weeks’ gestation)

face many serious adverse medical risks, including MACE

disorders (Mental Retardation, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, &

Epilepsy), serious infections, gastrointestinal injury, kidney

problems, ADHD, blindness, deafness, etc. It is old news that

IA (Induced Abortion) history raises a woman’s risk of a

premature delivery, since in 1967 high profile abortion

advocate, Dr. Malcolm Potts, admitted that (1, Potts):

“...there seems little doubt that there is a true relationship

between the high incidence of therapeutic abortion and

prematurity. The interruption of pregnancy in the young

(under seventeen) is more dangerous than in other cases...”

 

    The more premature (preterm) a newborn baby, the higher

her/his disability risk. For example, babies born very preterm

(under 32 weeks’ gestation) have 55 times the CP risk as do

full-term newborn babies, according to the 2008 ‘Himpens’

‘study of studies’ (aka meta-analysis).[1, Himpens] Those

born extremely preterm (under 28 weeks’ gestation) have

129 times the CP risk as do full-term babies. Thirteen (13)

statistically significant studies report that IA history raises

extremely preterm birth risk.[3-15] (Zero significant studies

report that IA history reduces extremely preterm birth risk.)

 

Best Evidence

    In an ABD (Abortion-Brain-Damage) law suit, a defendant

abortion doctor would like to deny that a premature delivery

subsequent to his abortion performed on the plaintiff’s mother

was a possible or probable cause of the mother’s premature

delivery of the plaintiff; (CP is a manifestation of brain

damage). Thus, the defendant doctor would like to be able to

cite at least one SRMA (Systematic Review with Meta-

Analysis), the crème de la crème of medical evidence, showing

that IA history either has no effect on premature delivery risk or

actually decreases ‘preemie’ risk. As of January 2019 such an

abortion doctor can not correctly cite even one such SRMA.

There are four (4) SRMAs in peer-reviewed medical journals

for the abortion-preemie risk, with 100% of the 4 SRMAs

reporting significantly raised premature delivery risk for women

with IA history.[16-19]

 

? Informed medical consent for Abortion-Preterm-Birth risk?

 

    Certainly, a consent form for any surgical abortion (e.g.

vacuum aspiration (aka ‘suction’) abortion) procedure you

underwent should have warned you about possible or probable

raised risk of premature delivery in a later pregnancy. Absence

of such a warning invites a legal claim, along the following

lines:

    “I was put at increased risk of premature delivery in a

    later pregnancy due to the abortion performed on me

     by Dr. John Doe. The consent form provided to me by

    Dr. Doe made no mention of future raised risk of a

    premature delivery.”

Another problem with many IA consent forms is that there

can be an implied ‘preemie’ warning, but it is only implied

to those who know the implications of ‘incompetent cervix’

(aka cervical insufficiency). (Instead of ‘incompetent cervix

a consent form may list increased risk of ‘lacerated cervix’).

The ‘gate’ of the womb (uterus) is the cervix, which in a

healthy pregnancy well into the third trimester opens, allowing

a baby to emerge from the womb and enter into mom’s birth

canal. If a woman’s cervix is lacerated , which can happen

during a surgical abortion such as a VAA (vacuum aspiration

abortion), this much increases a woman’s risk that her cervix

will open too early in a subsequent pregnancy, leading to a

premature delivery of her baby. So, for young pregnant women

‘lacerated cervix’ on a consent form should also have

accompanying text along the following lines:

    “A lacerated cervix raises your risk in a subsequent

    pregnancy that you will deliver your baby prematurely

    (under 37 weeks’ gestation) and such a ‘preemie’ baby

    has elevated risks of many serious conditions &

    disabilities, including autism, cerebral palsy, mental

    retardation, blindness, deafness, and serious infections.”

 

Should abortion doctors know about ACP (Abortion-CP) risk?

 

    The first two (2) SRMAs for the abortion-preemie risk were

published in peer-reviewed medical journals in 2009, including

the Dr. Prakesh Shah (University of Toronto) SRMA in the

prestigious British Journal of Obstetrics of Gynaecology.[16, 17]

Two (2) later SRMAs also validated the abortion-preemie risk.

[18, 19] In advanced countries medical doctors are expected by

legal authorities to keep up-to-date with medical knowledge in

their medical specialties. In 2001 Brent Rooney explicitly alerted

the medical community that a mother’s IA history was a credible

risk factor for increased cerebral palsy risk for a newborn baby.

This alert (via a published letter) appeared in the European

Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.

[20, Rooney] No counter argument refuting the Brent Rooney

2001 alert later appeared in this peer-reviewed medical journal.

In 2007 Dr, Byron Calhoun, Dr. Elizabeth Shadigian, and Brent

Rooney (MSc) in a peer-reviewed medical journal study estimated

that of U.S. babies born in 2002 1,096 very low birth weight

babies (under 1,500 grams) would be diagnosed with cerebral

palsy due to their mother’s prior induced abortion history.

[21, Calhoun]

 

The coming U.S. Autism Tsunami

    Autism is a very serious disability manifested by a child’s

very restricted interests, general disinterest with interacting

with his/her parents, and mental deficits (e.g. unable to make

sense of bus schedules). In the early 1960s the U.S. Autism

prevalence in children was no more than 1 in 10,000. Into

the 20th year of the 21st century about 1 U.S. child in 59

under 8 years has Autism. This is both a human tragedy and a

coming huge national economic burden. In 2007 Harvard U.

professor Michael Ganz (PhD) estimated the lifetime Autism

cost (medical + non-medical + lost income) for a U.S. resident

at $3.2 million.[22, Ganz] The current U.S. annual birth total

approximates 4 million. Thus the 1 in 59 statistic implies that

nearly 68 thousand U.S. newborn babies yearly will later be

diagnosed as having Autism. Total estimated lifetime costs for

these ~68 thousand newborn babies with Autism: ~$218 Billion.

In 2018 the first ever ‘study of studies’ (meta-analysis) was

published for Autism risk due to premature birth.[23, Agrawal].

From the conclusion section of the ‘Agrawal’ meta-analysis

abstract:

    “ASD [Autism Spectrum Disorder] is significantly

    higher in the preterm population...”

(There are many Autism risk factors (including maternal

infection) with preterm birth being one of the Autism risk

factors).

 

Improving success odds in a medical negligence law suits

 

    Chapter 4 [click on: http://www.top-sue.org/chapter-4 ]

explains how, before an honest and probing court, a plaintiff

can technically present a stronger case in an abortion medical

negligence law suit. First paragraph of chapter 4:

    “ In a medical negligence law suit the plaintiff suing a doctor

has the burden of proof on her/his shoulders to convince the

court that the M.D. was indeed negligent AND that the

negligence either caused the adverse side-effect in question or

was a major contributor to the side-effect. (Do not pursue a

medical negligence law suit, unless your trusted lawyer affirms

that your odds of legal success are very good. If given such an

assurance by your trusted lawyer, make a diary entry about that

assurance.) This BoP (Burden of Proof) legal standard is a major

advantage for defendant doctors in medical negligence law suits.”

 

      As explained in Chapter 4, a U.S. medical negligence plaintiff

only need demonstrate and convince a court that a litigated

risk is a POTENTIAL risk (i.e. not the higher standard of an

accepted medical risk) to improve his/her odds of winning

(before an honest & probing court). With 4 SRMAs, the highest

caliber of medical study, supporting abortion-preemie risk and

zero ‘study of studies’ denying this risk, how can the abortion-

preemie risk be considered not only not a confirmed adverse

abortion risk, but not even a POTENTIAL risk? In 2007 the

prestigious National Institute of Medicine (IoM) identified over

one dozen “Immutable Medical Risk Factors Associated with

Preterm Birth”, with the third listed risk factor bring:

“Prior first trimester induced abortion”[24, Behrman]

(The new name of the IoM is National Academy of Medicine).

However, if subsequent SRMAs had failed to confirm the 2007

NAM (formerly named IoM) finding, doubt would have been cast

on its abortion-preemie risk affirmation. The exact opposite

occurred, with confirmation of the NAM finding by all 4 SRMAs

& ZERO SRMAs failing to find raised premature birth risk due

to induced abortion history.

 

Conclusion: Repeat of the Abstract (at the beginning)

Summary

    Babies born prematurely (under 37 weeks’ gestation) face

raised risk of many serious handicaps compared to babies born

full-term. Two (2) of the risks, cerebral palsy (CP) and Autism,

can have total lifetime cost (medical + non-medical + lower

salary) for U.S. residents running well over 1 million dollars. The

more premature the birth, the higher the CP and Autism risks.

There is no excuse for not warning young women about future

raised risk of newborns with CP, Autism and other IA(Induced

Abortion) risks on consent forms, since over 50 years ago (1967)

high profile abortion advocate, Dr. Malcolm Potts, admitted that:

“...there seems little doubt that there is a true relationship

between the high incidence of therapeutic abortion and

prematurity. The interruption of pregnancy in the young

(under seventeen) is more dangerous than in other cases...”

Four (4) ‘study of studies’ (aka meta-analysis), the strongest

category of medical evidence, support IA history as

significantly raising preterm birth risk (with ZERO ‘study of

studies’ reporting no raised ‘preemie’ risk due to abortion

history). Raised cerebral palsy risk due to premature birth has

been an accepted medical fact for over 55 years. Do not pursue

a medical negligence law suit, unless your trusted lawyer affirms

that your odds of legal success are very good.

….._____________________________________________....

Chapter 6 address: http://www.top-sue.org/chapter-6

References

 

 

1 Dr. Malcolm Potts. Legal abortion in Eastern Europe.

Eugenics Review 1967;59:232-250

 

2 Himpens E, Van Den Broeck C, Oostra A, Claders P,

Vanhaesebrouck P. Prevalence, type, and distribution and severity

of cerebral palsy in relation to gestational age: a meta-analytic

review. Dev Med Child Neurol 2008;50:334-340. [ URL:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8749.2008.02047.x/pdf ]

 

3 Situ KC, Gissler M, Virtanen SM, Klemetti R. Risk of

Adverse Perinatal Outcomes after Repeat Terminations of Pregnancy

by their Methods: a Nationwide Register-based cohort study.

Paediatric Perinatal Epidemiology August 2017 [URL:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppe.12389/full

4 Usynina AA, Postoes VA, Grjiborski AM, Krettek A, Nieboer E,

et al. Maternal Risk Factors for Preterm Birth in Murmansk County,

Russia: A Register-Based Study. Paediatric Perinatal

Epidemiology September 2016 30(5):462-472 [Population: Russian;

Extremely-Preterm-Birth/IA O.R. 1.96 (1.32-2.91) ; URL:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppe.12304/abstract;jsessionid=21F58F4D094BE6E74835106D510579A6.f01t01?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage= ]

 

5 Scholten BL, Page-Christiaens CML, Franx A, Hukkelhoven

CWPM, Koster MPH. The influence of pregnancy termination on the

outcome of subsequent pregnancies: a retrospective cohort study.

BMJ OPEN 2013;3;e002803 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-002803

http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/3/5/e002803.full.pdf.html

 

6 Ghislain Hardy, Alice Benjamin, Haim A. Abenhaim.

Effects of Induced Abortions on Early Preterm Births

and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes. Journal of Obstetrics

and Gynaecology Canada 2013;35(2):138-143 URL:

http://jogc.com/abstracts/201302_Obstetrics_5.pdf

 

7 Raisanen S, Gissler M, Saari J, Kramer M, Heinon S.

Contribution of Risk Factors to Extremely, Very and Moderately

Preterm Term Births- Register-Based Analysis of 1,390,742 Singleton

Births. PLOS ONE April 2013;8(4):1-7

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0060660

 

8 Bhattacharya S, Lowit A, Bhattacharya S, Raja EA, Lee AM,

Mahmood T, Templeton A. Reproductive outcomes following induced

abortion; a national register-based cohort study in Scotland. BMJ OPEN

2012;2:e000911 [ doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-000911 ; URL:

http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/2/4/e000911.full.pdf ]

 

9 Klemetti R, Gissler M, Niinimaki M, Hemminki E. Birth outcomes

after induced abortion: a nationwide register-based study of first births in

Finland. Human Reproduction November 2012 27(11):3315-3320 [URL:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22933527 ]

 

10 Smith GCS, Shah I, White IR, Pell JP, Crossley JA, Dobbie R.

Maternal and biochemical predictors of spontaneous preterm birth

among nulliparous women: a systematic analysis in relation to

degree of prematurity. International J Epidemiology 2006;35(5):

1169-1177

 

11 Stang P, Hammond AO, Bauman P. Induced Abortion Increases

the Risk of Very Preterm Delivery; Results from a Large Perinatal

Database. Fertility Sterility. Sept 2005;S159 [Study only published

as an abstract]

 

12 Moreau C, Kaminski M, Ancel PY, Bouyer J, et al. Previous

induced abortions and the risk of very preterm delivery: results of

the EPIPAGE study. British J Obstetrics Gynaecology 2005;112(4):

430-437 [abstract online: www.

blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00478.x/abs/ ]

 

13 Lumley J. The association between prior spontaneous abortion,

prior induced abortion and preterm birth in first singleton births.

Prenat Neonat Med 1998;3:21-24.

 

14 Lumley J. The epidemiology of preterm birth. Bailliere's Clin

Obstet Gynecology 1993;7(3):477-498

 

15 Levin A, Schoenbaum S, Monson R, Stubblefield P,

Ryan K. Association of Abortion With Subsequent Pregnancy

Loss. JAMA 1980;243(24):2495-2499

 

16 Shah PS, Zao J. Induced termination of pregnancy and low

birthweight and preterm birth: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BJOG 2009;116:1425-1442. [URL:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2009.02278.x/pdf ]

 

17 Swingle HM, Colaizy TT, Zimmerman MB, et al Abortion and

the risk of subsequent preterm birth: a systematic review and

meta-analysis. J Reproductive Med 2009;54:95-108.

[ URL: http://johnrodgerssmith.com/MedicalObservations/Swingle/JRM%20Swingle%20paper%202009.pdf ]

 

18 Lemmers M, Vershoor MA, Hooker AB, Opmeer BC, Limpens J,

Huirne JA, Ankum WM, Mol BW. Does dilation and curettage

(D & C) increase the risk of preterm birth in subsequent pregnancies?

A systematic review and meta-analysis. [Abstract URL: http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2015/11/02/humrep.dev274.abstract

 

19 Saccone G, Perriera L, Berghella V. Prior uterine perforation of

pregnancy as independent risk factor for preterm birth: a systematic

review and meta-analysis. Amer J Obstetrics Gynecology

May 2016;214(5):572-591

http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(15)02596-X/abstract

 

20 Rooney B. Elective surgery boosts cerebral palsy risk. European

Journal Obstetrics Gynecology Reproductive Biology 2001;

96(2):239-240

 

21 Calhoun BC, Shadigian E, Rooney B. Cost consequences of

induced abortion as an attributable risk for preterm birth and

informed consent. Journal Reproductive Medicine

2007;52:929-939.

[Abtract:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=calhoun%20shadigian%20rooney]

22 Ganz ML. The lifetime distribution of the incremental societal

costs of autism. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2007;161:343-349.

http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=570087

 

23 Agrawal S, Rao SC, Bulsara MK, Patole SK. Prevalence

of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Preterm Infants: A

Meta-analysis. Pediatrics 2018;142(3):1-14 [URL:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30076190 ]

 

24 Behrman RS, Butler AS, Alexander GR. Preterm Birth: Causes,

Consequences, and Prevention. National Academy Press,

Washington DC (2007)

[URL: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11622&page=625 ]